Drug Facts and Info

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Hookah Fact Sheet

This one page fact sheet developed by the Long Island Prevention Resource Center will teach you the basics of Hookahs.

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Electronic Cigarette (E-Cigarette) Fact Sheet

This one page fact sheet developed by the Long Island Prevention Resource Center will teach you the basics of Electronic Cigarettes.

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SAMHSA-2009- Results from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health-Volume I-Summary of National Findings

This report presents the first information from the 2009 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), an annual survey sponsored by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). The survey is the primary source of information on the use of illicit drugs, alcohol, and tobacco in the civilian, noninstitutionalized population of the United States aged 12 years old or older. The survey interviews approximately 67,500 persons each year. Unless otherwise noted, all comparisons in this report described using terms such as “increased,” “decreased,” or “more than” are statistically significant at the .05 level.

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DEA’s 2016 National Drug Threat Assessment

The 2016 National Drug Threat Assessment is a comprehensive strategic assessment of the threat posed to the United States by the trafficking and abuse of illicit and prescription drugs. This report combines federal, state, and local law enforcement reporting; public health data; news reports; and intelligence from other government agencies to provide a coordinated and balanced approach to determining which substances represent the greatest drug threat to the United States.

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E-Cigarette Use Among Youth and Young Adults: A Report of the Surgeon General

This timely report highlights the rapidly changing patters of e-cigarette use among youth and young adults, assesses what we know about the health effects of using these products, and describes strategies that tobacco companies use to recruit our nation’s youth and young adults to try and continue using e-cigarettes. The report also outlines interventions that can be adopted to minimize the harm these products cause our nation’s youth.

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Talk with Your Teen About E-cigarettes: A Tip Sheet for Parents

BEFORE THE TALK Know the facts. • Get credible information about e-cigarettes and young people at E-cigarettes.SurgeonGeneral.gov.

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E-Cigarette Use Among Youth and Young Adults Fact Sheet

This Surgeon General’s report comprehensively reviews the public health issue of e-cigarettes and their impact on U.S. youth and young adults. Studies highlighted in the report cover young adolescents (11-14 years of age); adolescents (15-17 years of age); and/or young adults (18-25 years of age). Scientific evidence contained in this report supports the following facts:

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Why Children Start Drinking

There are many reasons why children start drinking.

As children approach their teen years, they begin to experience many emotional and physical changes – changes that are not always easy. During this challenging and confusing time, even good children may experiment with alcohol.

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The Power of Parenting: I know my child is using alcohol/drugs

If you know your child is using drugs, you have good reason to be concerned. You may feel helpless, fearful and even ashamed, but you CAN do something. You can try a variety of ways that will make your child’s drug use less appealing for them. It is important to note that getting help for your child is a process, never an event. This means that you will have to try a variety of techniques over time, while never giving up. This brochure will offer ideas and tips for you to begin to help your child, but it is most important that you educate yourself and get help for yourself as well.

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Prescription Drug Use Brochure

Prescription drug misuse is the use of prescription medication in a manner that is not prescribed by a health care practitioner. This includes using someone else’s prescription or using your own prescription in a way not directed by your doctor.

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The Power of Parenting: I think my child is using alcohol/drugs

Any one of the following behaviors can be a symptom of normal adolescence. However, keep in mind that the key is change. It is important to note any significant changes in your child’s physical appearance, personality, attitude or behavior.

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Exposure of African-American Youth to Alcohol Advertising, 2008 and 2009

African-American Youth Exposed to More Magazine and Television Alcohol Advertising than Youth in General

Alcohol is the most widely used drug among African-American youth

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INHALANTS

Inhalants are breathable chemical vapors that users intentionally inhale because of the chemicals’ mind-altering effects. The substances inhaled are often common household products that contain volatile solvents, aerosols, or gases.

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Intervention Guide

What to do if your child is drinking or using drugs

If you’re concerned about your teen’s drug or alcohol use, then it is time to take action. You can never be too safe or intervene too early – even if you believe your teen is just “experimenting.” Read on to find answers to parents’ most pressing questions about interventions.

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Suffolk County’s HOEAP Report

Findings and Recommendations of the Suffolk Heroin and Opiate Advisory Panel

The Panel, comprised of the treatment professionals, prevention experts, school officials and health care professionals listed below, was charged with making recommendations about ways in which Suffolk County can “improve its response to heroin and opiates,” in terms of prevention, treatment and recovery support.

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Did You Know June 2011 – Alcopops

Summer is back and so is the heat!  Doesn’t a nice cold beverage sound good right about now? Maybe some iced tea or lemonade to cool you off? But be careful; make sure the kids don’t get confused. . .

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2010 Partnership Attitude Tracking Study – Teens and Parents

Following a decade of steady declines, The Partnership Attitude Tracking Study (PATS), sponsored by MetLife Foundation indicates that teen drug and alcohol use is headed in the wrong direction, with marked increases in teen use of marijuana and Ecstasy over the past three years.

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PYM Audience Tip Sheet

Parents: You Matter

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Tips_for_Teens-The_Truth_About_Club_Drugs

Club drugs affect your brain. The term “club drugs” refers to a wide variety of drugs often used at all-night dance parties (“raves”), nightclubs, and concerts. Club drugs can damage the neurons in your brain, impairing your senses, memory, judgment, and coordination.

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Tips for Teens-The Truth About Cocaine

Cocaine affects your brain. The word “cocaine” refers to the drug in both a powder (cocaine) and crystal (crack) form. It is made from the coca plant and causes a short-lived high that is immediately followed by opposite, intense feelings of depression, edginess, and a craving for more of the drug. Cocaine may be snorted as a powder, converted to a liquid form for injection with a needle, or processed into a crystal form to be smoked.

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Tips for Teens-The Truth About Hallucinogens

Hallucinogens affect your brain. Hallucinogens change the way the brain interprets time, reality, and the environment around you. They also affect the way you move, react to situations, think, hear, and see. This may make you think that you’re hearing voices, seeing images, and feeling things that don’t exist.

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Tips for Teens-The Truth About Heroin

Heroin affects your brain. Heroin enters the brain quickly. It slows down the way you think, slows down reaction time, and slows down memory. This affects the way you act and make decisions.

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Tips for Teens-The Truth About Inhalants

Inhalants affect your brain. Inhalants are substances or fumes from products such as glue or paint thinner that are sniffed or “huffed” to cause an immediate high. Because they affect your brain with much greater speed and force than many other substances, they can cause irreversible physical and mental damage before you know what’s happened.

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Tips for Teens-The Truth About Marijuana

Marijuana affects your brain. THC (the active ingredient in marijuana) affects the nerve cells in the part of the brain where memories are formed.

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Tips for Teens-The Truth About Steroids

Steroids affect your heart. Steroid abuse has been associated with cardiovascular disease, including heart attack and stroke. These heart problems can even happen to athletes under the age of 30.

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Suffolk County Police Department Operation Medicine Cabinet

Suffolk County Police Department Operation Medicine Cabinet Drop Off Locations